Your Adoption Resource

The vision of Adoption Learning Partners (ALP) is to make a positive measurable impact on adoption outcomes. We offer meaningful, timely, web-based educational adoption resources for professionals, parents, adopted individuals, and the families that love them.

Access to support is a cornerstone of Adoption Learning Partners. You can find support on our site from our courses and from each other. Our site is designed for people who may live far away from knowledgeable, experienced adoption resources, or for those whose time is limited because of the demands of work and family schedules.

We offer an array of interactive, e-learning courses that are designed to increase each person's understanding of the joys and challenges of adoption. Throughout our site, we offer downloads of articles and papers you may find interesting. We also have a community forum - it's there for you to be able to interact with others who are on this journey as well.

We included the word Partners in our name because we want to be your partner in this journey. We also partner with other major adoption resources and experts to develop and offer course content that is meaningful for each of our users.

We are here when you need us. You can visit the site when it is convenient for you. The courses can help prepare people for becoming an adoptive family, or help adoptive families with growing children gain new skills.

ALP also serves as a resource for social service professionals, equipping them with the training and tools they need to prepare adoptive families and counsel people around post-adoption issues. Our courses help social service professionals to meet a variety of new and ongoing training requirements set forth by federal and state governments and professional licensing associations.

Recorded Webinar

Black Children and Mental Health

Black Children and Mental Health

In this webinar, The Cradle’s Our Children initiative brings together a panel of therapists and parents to discuss the stigma that exists around mental health and why the rate of Black families seeking mental health care and treatment is much lower than White families. They talk about why mental health services should be designed with cultural and social nuances in mind as well as the upward trend in mental health needs as Covid-19 has interrupted the lives of so many kids and limited their social activities.

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